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"Teaching is about learning, some days I learn a whole lot more than I teach."


I first hear about NBPTS
Applying in Idaho
Orientation at the U of I
The "box" arrives
Why do this to yourself?
Do's and Don'ts
The projects/portfolio
My students are in it too
My fellow coworkers
Prepping for the tests
Education/Misc. Links
Resources and Help Center  E-mail address

 

 

 

Why in the world do this to yourself?

            There are as many reasons for getting involved in National Boards as there are candidates.   My personal reasons for seeking National Certification are rather boring actually.  After teaching almost 20 years and after receiving  more than my share of  praise and accolades, I still know in my "heart of hearts" that I can do a better job.  Indeed, a much better job.   To me the profession of teaching is a blend of science and art.

                The science part of this crazy career is the part that Schools of Education try to drill into the prospective classroom teacher.  As a senior graduating with excellent grades in all of my education classes, I felt reasonably qualified to enter this exciting profession.  The portion of the profession that never really entered the discussion, however, is that portion that revolves around the artistic aspects of being more than just an adequate teacher.  I'm happy to say that I've had the privilege of being in a number of classes that were taught by really fantastic teachers.  Man, when I say they were  "artists" that's what I mean. 

                I've had moments when some of my classes reached that level.        If I can do anything to make it happen more regularly...hey, that's why I'm in this.

                        

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  The comments expressed on this site are my personal opinions and do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of  the National Board for Professional Teaching Standards.  All rights reserved by William C. Dean.  July 1999.